How to Make and Use Redscale Film

Alright, budding film photographers out there. We have to have a talk.

Through my work at the photo lab, I see all sorts of film come in and I’m happy to see so many of you experimenting with different film types and effects. This is how we grow as artists!

But I’m seriously shaking my head at those of you who are shelling out $10+ for rolls of redscale film. This is the easiest DIY in the world and if you want to have fun with film, doing things the DIY way takes it to the next level. Continue reading How to Make and Use Redscale Film

5 Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Travel Pics!

As a devotee of Instagram, I know how it usually is when it comes to travel photography. We snap a million great photos, eagerly post a few to social media to share with our followers, and then we let it drop, except for the occasional Throwback Thursday.

Your photos can do so much more for you!

Travel can be one of the most rewarding experiences we can treat ourselves to. Learning about other cultures and ways of life can humble you, expand your mind and heart, and make you appreciate both the things you have at home and the things you don’t.

If you leave your photos only on social media, you’re missing out. Your home’s walls, shelves, and niches all deserve to showcase your travel memories and provide you that daily opportunity to reconnect with great experiences. Continue reading 5 Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Travel Pics!

DIY Pinhole Camera Lens

Pinhole cameras are simple little devices that use a tiny hole to focus and expose an image. They are the simplest of lenses and are based on the camera obscura effect.

Since the “lens” is so tiny, pinhole cameras create dreamy images. The pinhole makes for a very narrow depth of field and aperture, which works together to add mood & mystery to otherwise ordinary scenes.

For those photographers who like to DIY their equipment and experiment with various photographic processes, making a pinhole lens for your SLR or Micro Four Thirds camera is one of the easiest and most fun projects. As a bonus, it’s really inexpensive, especially if you happen to have a spare body cap for your camera. If you don’t, you can pick one up for $6 to $15. Everything else on the equipment list is likely already in your house!

Ready to get started? Follow along below! Continue reading DIY Pinhole Camera Lens

Using Layers to Give Photos Magic & Whimsy

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Glitter is a beautiful creation. It adds sparkle and shine to otherwise dull surfaces and is fairly synonymous with holiday cheer. Can you picture a Christmas-themed item that doesn’t have at least a little glitter?

No, you cannot.

Working with glitter can be an absolute nightmare, though. Eventually, you’ll just find glitter everywhere, making it’s sparkly appearance even weeks after using it in some minor project. So, just in time for the holidays, I took one for the team and busted out my extensive glitter collection to create a rainbow of glitter photographs. Abstract, shiny, and mess-free, these images are the perfect solution for sparkly Christmas cards, elegant name plates for holiday meals, or anything else you can think of in need of a little holiday polish.

The magic doesn’t stop there, though! These glitter photos can make an interesting addition to any other photograph to add a little whimsy & wonderment. In this tutorial, I’ll teach you how to use my stock pack and Photoshop’s layers function to add some enchanting textures to otherwise normal images. Continue reading Using Layers to Give Photos Magic & Whimsy

Indiana Jill: DIY Fruit Liqueur

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As we head into the Christmas season, there’s one thing most of us can enjoy: good drinks.

If you ever wanted to try making your own liqueurs, I recently posted a photo-filled tutorial on the subject over on Indiana Jill. I used Nanking cherries for the recipe, but there’s a world of flavours to choose from just by perusing the frozen fruit aisle at your local grocery store.

Have fun & happy drinking!

Read More on IndianaJill

How to Save Water-Damaged Film

In 2013, Calgary experienced a pretty devastating flood. Homes lying in the floodplain at best had their basements filled with water, and at worst were rendered too damaged to be livable.

Though it is one of the worst places to keep one’s film, many had left their negatives in boxes in their basements, leaving them to get water-logged and if left untreated, completely ruined. For some professional photographers I know, this meant losing a huge chunk of their photographic history. One in particular saw his entire portfolio of images vanish when someone trying to be helpful said she could save them, but in the end just made things worse. Continue reading How to Save Water-Damaged Film

Noon Hour Lecture at the University of Calgary

Next Wednesday, I’ll be delivering a talk on archaeological photography in the Archaeology Department at the University of Calgary as part of their Noon Hour Lecture series. For more information, check out the poster above.

No polarizer? Mafi mushkala!

While wandering around Shobek castle the other day, I wanted to photograph a tunnel. There was a little problem with this: I was exhausted from Petra weekend and the idea of lugging around my SLR through another set of ruins made me have a tired.

It wasn’t happening. Good thing I like the camera on my phone. Bad thing that my phone does a terrible job of adjusting for varied light. Continue reading No polarizer? Mafi mushkala!